Families

Standing Interrogation for Sarah (Higginbotham) Braddock

In the process of filing a Southern Commission claim, each witness on behalf of the claimant is questioned by an official on behalf of the Claims Commission using a standard set of questions, which by Sarah’s replies to some of these questions, must have changed somewhat during the early 1870s. “The changes from the original form as presented in the first General Report and as amended in the second were not designed to affect the policy of the commission.” So the date the interrogation occurred on is important, as the questions asked and the order of them differ from the 1874 “final version” published online. When a claimant provides an answer it is listed to the left which specific question they answered, but not the question, and it’s very clear by Sarah’s ancestors the questions were ordered differently then the 1874 version. Sarah’s hearing was on 2 August 1872 at Fernandina, and was done by C. L. Robinson, Special Commissioner of the Commissioners of Claims. The packet starts with Sarah’s sworn testimony. Question 1 is a standard form that is filled out for each witness and signed by the special commissioner. This page appears out of order in the packet, stuck between pages 9 and 10. I present it first, however, since the packets contents was scanned in no particular order. Standing Interrogation The following questions will be put to every person who gives testimony: Question 1: What is your name, your age, your residence and how long has it...

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Will of John S Braddock, 1857 Page 1

Will of John S. Braddock, 1857

Found within Southern Claims Commission File #13525 is a copy of the will of John S. Braddock, written in 1857. In order for Sarah Braddock to file for the claim in 1872, she needed to prove she had legal authority over her husband, John S. Braddock’s property, since he was deceased. The commissioner labeled the will Exhibit B. This will is important for it’s identity of the 15 children of John and Sarah, their birth order, and for the identity of the 23 slaves by name and their approximate ages and sex. I found a copy of John’s will in Nassau County’s Land records too. There were noticeable differences in names of some members of the Exhibit B State of FloridaNassau County In the name of God amen — I John S. Braddock of the State and County aforesaid, planter, being of sound mind and in reasonal [sic] body health, do make, constitute and publish this my last will and testament hereby revoking and making void all former wills by me at any time heretofore made. ~ And first I direct that my body be decently interred in some fit and proper place, and that my funeral be conducted in a manner corresponding with my situation in life ~ and as to such worldly goods and estate as it has pleased God to entrust me with, I dispose of the same as follows ~ First, I direct that all my just debts be paid — — I give and bequeath...

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The Nassau County Genealogist cover

Braddock & Christopher Families

Contributed by William Braddock John Braddock was born on 23 May 1731 in South Carolina. On 16 July 1769, he married Lucia Ann Cook, the daughter of James Cook. They were the parents of five known children: John David (1776-1841) married Martha Christopher; William (1777-1855) married Charlotte Christopher; Lucia (b. 1778) married William Berrie; Mary Ann (b. 1780) married John Edwards; and Hester (b. 1785) married John B. Christopher. John Braddock served as a soldier in Georgia during the Revolutionary War and received a grant of land in Glynn County, Georgia, for his service. He was commissioned a captain in the Glynn County Militia in 1793. He died on 16 June 1797 in Glynn County. John David Braddock was born in 1776 and died on 19 October 1841. On 9 May 1804, he married Martha Christopher, the daughter of Spicer Christopher, in Nassau County. Martha was born in 1786 and died on 6 December 1861. John David and Martha Braddock were the parents of six known children: John (1805-1863) married Sarah Higginbotham; Spicer C. (b. 23 Apr 1807) married Anna Sever Sapp (b. 2 Dec 1822); Charlotee (b. 1812) never married; Alexander (b. 1814) married Elizabeth; William M. (b. 1819) married Jane Christopher; and, Susannah (b. 1822) never married. John David Braddock was baptized as a Catholic before his marriage as all Protestant citizens of Spanish Florida did in order to remain in the territory. He managed a plantation for his father-in-law until he obtained his own 640 acres at...

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The Nassau County Genealogist cover

Henry Timanus Family

Henry Timanus was the son of Charles Timanus and Jane Lester. He was born on 4 January 1815 and died on 13 January 1872. He married Carolina Rosella Glover Marsh about 1847, probably in South Carolina. She was the daughter of John Marsh and Sarah Ann Glover . Carolina was born on 22 November 1830 and died 20 December 1893 at Gainesville, Florida. Both are buried in Bosque Bello Cemetery in Fernandina Beach, Florida. Henry Timanus moved from Baltimore and in 1844 was living in Newton County, Georgia. On 3 May 1847, he bought land belonging to John Marsh at a sheriff’s sale in Edgefield District, South Carolina. On 7 January 1853, he received property on his wife’s behalf from the estate of her mother, Sarah S. Marsh. About 1857, the Timanus family moved to Fernandina where Henry made his home until his death. During the year 1857, Henry Timanus made a number of 99-year leases in the new town of Fernandina from the Florida Railroad Company. Additionally, he purchased property for his own account. During the Civil War, Timanus was appointed as a captain in the Confederate Army on 19 May 1862. He served as Assistant Commissary of Subsistence at Lake City, Florida. Records also show that he served as a major in the Quartermaster Corps under General Finegan. He was surrendered by Brigadier General E. McCook and paroled at Tallahassee, Florida, on 10 May 1865. The war left him with weakened finances and health. As a result, he...

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Gravestone of Levin and Sarah (Daugherty) Tomlinson

The Levin Tomlinson Family

Levin Tomlinson was born on 11 April 1813, the son of William Tomlinson (10 Dec 1781 SC – 10 Dec 1865 Clinch Co., GA) and Nancy Register (1782-1873). Levin grew up living in Appling and Irwin counties Georgia. He married Sarah Daugherty on 26 July 1843, who at the time resided on Suwannoochee Creek below the present town of DuPont in Ware county. Sarah was born on 19 March 1825, to James Daugherty and Sarah Bassett, in Appling County, Georgia. Levin and Sarah’s first home was in Clinch County, Georgia. They had 15 children, and this is their story.

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Snowball Cemetery

The Family of Edwin Ruthben and Charlotte Marion Snowball

Pauline Gertrude Ellis Roberts, then 85 years old, wrote two books, one on the Snowball Family entitled History of the Snowball Family, 1796-1972, which traced the family back to Maine in 1796. The other book was about the Jacksonville Zoo which she researched for several years before printing it. In 1977, she provided information to the Jacksonville Genealogical Society for publication in its quarterly and it is included here. Mrs. Roberts was the granddaughter of Edwin Ruthben Snowball and his wife, Charlotte Marion Whittemore. She said, “The old Snowball Plantation house stood atop a yellow sandhill, one mile west of Lofton Creek on Harts Road. The graveyard was between the old plantation house privy and the backyard fence, bordering on Harts Road. This was a deep rutted dirt wagon road that crested the hill back of the house and ran parallel to the fence. It crossed Lofton Creek east and wound its way to Chester, Florida.” She continued, “ My grandfather, Edwin Ruthben Snowball, died on June 20, 1891, at the age of 58 and was buried in the backyard graveyard along with kith and kin of the Snowball and Whittemore families. All seven of the Snowball children and their spouses signed a warranty deed which was executed on 2 April 1904. This deed transferred from my grandmother, Mrs. Charlotte Marion Snowball, to Mrs. E. J. Johnson, both of Nassau County, the last of the old Snowball Plantation property except one quarter of an acre for a graveyard.” The seven...

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